Conservation vital to avoid Day Zero

To avert a tryst with Day Zero, Bengaluru must revive its catchment area by conserving water and installing more sewage treatment plants for recycling, the Indian Institute of Sciences Director Anurag Kumar said.

Speaking at the World Water Day event organised by the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) here on Thursday, Kumar said urbanisation, encroachment of lakebeds and stormwater drains, besides the large-scale use of fertilizers, have destroyed Bengalurus catchment area. Nearly 80% of the 1,400 MLD (million litres per day) drinking water supplied by BWSSB to the city has been wasted. This needs to be curbed with STPs to effectively manage wastewater, Kumar said.

He said the IISc has two one-million-litre capacity STPs that provide treated water for toilet and gardening in the campus.

Reacting to an article in Centre for Science and Environment titled “Bengaluru might head the Cape Town way, says assessment by Down To Earth magazine,” BWSSB Chairman Tushar Girinath ruled out the immediate possibility of the city drying up.

But he cautioned that the city would eventually meet its Day Zero if steps are not taken to conserve water.

“Weve plans of saving the rainwater in the citys lakes and use it after treatment,” Girinath said. BWSSB is thinking of using these (waterbodies) from 2023, provided we progress in conserving water in the lakes.”

BWSSBs engineer-in-chief Kemparamaiah said Cauvery water supply may be affected only if there are power cuts, which would stop water being pumped.

“In case theres a power crisis, which would hit the pumping stations, water would be supplied to the affected areas by tankers,” he said, adding that the Board has kept 64 tankers ready.

Elsewhere in the city, Young Mens Christian Association (YMCA) organised a rally to spread awareness on water conservation. Student of Mitralaya School participated in the rally, where they performed skits highlighting the theme.

To avert a tryst with Day Zero, Bengaluru must revive its catchment area by conserving water and installing more sewage treatment plants for recycling, the Indian Institute of Science’s Director Anurag Kumar said.

Speaking at the World Water Day event organised by the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) here on Thursday, Kumar said urbanisation, encroachment of lakebeds and stormwater drains, besides the large-scale use of fertilizers, have destroyed Bengaluru’s catchment area. Nearly 80% of the 1,400 MLD (million litres per day) drinking water supplied by BWSSB to the city has been wasted. This needs to be curbed with STPs to effectively manage wastewater, Kumar said.

He said the IISc has two one-million-litre capacity STPs that provide treated water for toilet and gardening in the campus.

Reacting to an article in Centre for Science and Environment titled “Bengaluru might head the Cape Town way, says assessment by Down To Earth magazine,” BWSSB Chairman Tushar Girinath ruled out the immediate possibility of the city drying up.

But he cautioned that the city would eventually meet its Day Zero if steps are not taken to conserve water.

“We’ve plans of saving the rainwater in the city’s lakes and use it after treatment,” Girinath said. BWSSB is thinking of using these (waterbodies) from 2023, provided we progress in conserving water in the lakes.”

BWSSB’s engineer-in-chief Kemparamaiah said Cauvery water supply may be affected only if there are power cuts, which would stop water being pumped.

“In case there’s a power crisis, which would hit the pumping stations, water would be supplied to the affected areas by tankers,” he said, adding that the Board has kept 64 tankers ready.

Elsewhere in the city, Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) organised a rally to spread awareness on water conservation. Student of Mitralaya School participated in the rally, where they performed skits highlighting the theme.

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